CC.4: Intro week, personal goals

  • What brings you to LFP?
  • What are your personal goals for this course?

I found out about LFP from a mutual friend here in the Lawrence/KCMO library community. I’ve always been fairly interested in privacy, mostly out of sheer spite, and so deciding to steer that direction during my library studies has felt a little bit like a no-brainer. I’m really passionate about ensuring that patrons understand the value of their data, both to themselves, and to those who want to capitalize on it. I want to help increase understanding of what data is, what is does, and how best to manage it. Especially in my work with young kids, and being in a red state, I think that privacy is becoming more important than ever, while at the same time becoming harder and harder to achieve.

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I began thinking about teaching privacy courses at the library (specifically privacy for advocacy and privacy for reproductive justice) sometime this summer. There’s been a rapid increase in legislation in Indiana that targets reproductive justice, mutual aid groups, and queer educational materials. I wanted to learn more and protect myself on a personal level, but I was really struggling to find any local anti-surveillance privacy courses that didn’t collude with the police. I had engaged with Library Freedom Project briefly in 2020, shortly after they released their statement “It is not enough to say Black Lives Matter-- libraries must divest from police,” and thought they would be an excellent place to start.

My personal goal is to feel comfortable training both patrons and library staff on some aspects of privacy at the end of this course, hopefully submitting a Community Action Plan to our programming team.

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Chinyere encouraged me to apply, and having been in a community of values-minded library workers I know we are capable of organizing for more socially just libraries and more accessible libraries. I am eager to connect and build power with library workers to build the abolitionist libraries of our dreams! I think a key component of that is understanding how to protect ourselves and one another and our communities from surveillance. I hope in several weeks to have the foundations to offer empowering privacy trainings within my communities and to have built up trust among library workers here to continue to organize.

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What brings you to LFP?

I have known library colleagues who have participated in LFP. I also started following people like Alison and others on Twitter after looking for alternatives to ALA and Library Journal. I often feel that the current library professional organizations don’t really represent my values and are not advocates for library workers.

What are your personal goals for this course?

My personal goals for this course are to learn skills and resources that I can share with my colleagues at my branch. We are working on developing computer classes at our branch and I think this course will give me some strategies I can share with my patrons. I am a youth services librarian and I believe this course will help me be a better advocate for the safety and privacy of kids/teens.

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I found the Library Freedom Project through an online library/librarian related social group. I found the topics of privacy, misinformation, and information gatekeeping very interesting while completing my MLIS degree and used often wrote about them for classwork.

I am hoping to gain some insight from this course to help add to the learning aid on data privacy and ethics that I have already created. I would like to evolve the training to include some data privacy and data retention policies and procedures.

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hi all! i learned about LFP when alison showed up as a guest speaker for one of my library grad classes taught by dr. miriam sweeney (shout out to dr. sweeney…easily the best professor i had in library school). i applied to one of the crash courses last year and have to admit i regret dropping out, but life got a little messy and overwhelming.

my personal goal for this course is simply to become more knowledgeable on privacy issues, particularly on how to apply harm reduction practices to better protect ourselves and our data. i have a background in education and programming, so i’m always looking for ways to be a more informed and compassionate educator.

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What brings you to LFP?

Very similar response to Rachel here. LFP came into my consciousness with the 2020 article on police divestment. I was so frustrated that there was minimal discourse on the ways in which libraries and librarians weaponize police against patrons. I had just started working at my library branch a year prior and spent the majority of that first year retraining the staff on public safety and policing in a predominantly black and brown neighborhood. The article made me feel like I wasn’t alone and gave me hope that the conversation could be bigger, deeper, and more impactful. When I looked into LFP, I stumbled on the privacy crash courses. I kept missing the deadline to apply until this year when I finally made a calendar reminder for myself. :joy:

What are your personal goals for this course?

I’ve been doing tech workshops and one-on-one help for a while. It’s one of my most well-attended programs. I’ve had a few folks ask me when I’ll be offering some 201 type courses and I feel we can’t move past “how does this thing even work” without addressing “what happens now that you know how to use it.” So I’m hoping this course gives me a good bibliography of sources to use to develop some well-rounded public programs. My bigger goal is to develop a cohort of young people to do quarterly privacy audits at the senior center, essentially reaching two audiences with one initiative. More than anything, my goal is to allow whatever emerges overtime to guide the final outcome. These are some things I’ve considered, but I don’t want to limit the potential of what could be. So I’m excited to learn with and from everyone.

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I learned about LFP from a few friends/colleagues who have completed the program and found it really interesting… library world doesn’t necessarily reserve a lot of space to discuss privacy, whether for patrons or library employees so I appreciate this space.

In recent years I’ve been thinking way more about privacy especially as it seems like overall surveillance has increased. Not just security cameras or our own personal devices, but also the way people observe each other by posting Ring camera footage on Facebook or sharing photos or live tweeting seemingly charming stories about strangers who are on dates or meet-cutes. My goal is to learn tools to help educate library staff on matters of privacy and think about it a little differently, and hopefully in turn, educate patrons on privacy and what expectations of privacy are in the library space.

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I’m so excited to get to know all of you! And I’m delighted to see that several of you have found LFP by way of our 2020 statement about libraries divesting from the police. That’s something I’m really proud of, which I feel encapsulates so much of what we’re trying to do in one document – driven by values that you don’t find articulated much in the library world, necessary, practically focused, and part of the larger body of work that we’re putting into the world. Plus, that statement was created by easily 20-30 of our members working together, which always makes me happy.

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I forgot how I originally came across LFP. All I remember was my promise to myself that whatever job I got post-undergrad I’d want to use it to create a more livable world (it’s that first gen guilt/energyy). Once I got my first job as at Huntington Beach Public Libraries, I used my information professional knowledge :stuck_out_tongue: to web search library movements that were working towards justice and I discovered LFP. Although I wanted to apply for CC 3, a lot of moving made it a bit difficult and now that I am more settled (as in have stable housing lol) I am ready to continue the work!

My personal goal is to engage with the material as fully as I can. It can be tempting to breeze through readings but I would like to be present and participate as fully as I am able to. I would also like to stay in contact with folks from the crash course and join the network of library workers trying to create something better. Sometimes library work that is oriented toward justice can feel a little bit lonesome if there aren’t people in your branch who are supportive of that work. Staying in contact with people who are similarly values-minded can be really big in preventing burn-out.

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Like others, I found out about LFP while looking for alternatives to ALA and other major library organizations. It wasn’t until talking to another LFP member, Lawrence M., that I thought it would be a great opportunity to go through this crash course (and I’m glad I applied!).

My goal is to gain more insight on privacy and police surveillance. I’m planning to bring gained knowledge and resources into my library and have already set up a meeting with my colleagues to do so at the end of this academic semester. I’m definitely excited for what’s to come!

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My colleagues and I learned of LFP through webinars and forums. We all have common interest in privacy issues and wondered how we could apply them to our institution. The Health Privacy in a Pandemic World series was where I saw applicable examples of security and privacy barriers within health care systems - both personal and institutional. I was also involved in the 2021 LFP crash course on Systems. This prompted collaboration with our universities faculty development center and IT services to present on security and privacy concepts at our fall teaching academy. The plan is to expand on these concepts and present as part of data privacy week in January. The creation of library wide privacy policies are also a future goal.

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I don’t remember when I exactly heard about LFP, but I do remember bringing it up at an Intellectual Freedom Panel meeting and the chair at the time had just been through one of the cohorts. She strongly encouraged me to apply and three years later here I am!

My goals are both simple, to be able to speak more authoritatively on privacy in both my personal and professional life, and more complex, to look deeper at the intersection of accessibility, information literacy and privacy, and how the increased access to technology coupled with the ongoing threat to our privacy through data collection and lower info/tech literacy, places certain groups of people at greater risk than others.

I’m also taking a course on Learning Analytics and Privacy that so far is a great compliment to this course and I’m interested to learn more about the different ethical questions factions of librarians or organizations ask (or don’t) themselves.

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Like other folks I found LFP because I was searching for alternatives. During my MLIS, I felt my program didn’t align enough with my values and politics. I’ve shared with LFP folks before, but summer of 2020 in Minneapolis escalated everything. The ongoing surveillance and militarization of my community and neighborhood really brought into focus how important it was to educate myself and find a community that could be a support in that.

I am starting my new library job next in two weeks (!), and am feeling really energized to bring this learning into that context. I’ve also recently joined the Women’s Prison Book Project collective here in the Cities and have a LOT of thoughts about the privacy and security as it pertain to incarcerated folks. I’d love to bring some of these strategies into that space, in particular, since the collective handles a ton of personal information from folks in prison.

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